FEEFAA is a documentary of hand-made gold jewellery designs in Iraq 1900 – 2000.  FEEFAA exhibits collections of jewellery, their place of origin and information about the goldsmiths. The goal is to provide inspiration for new designers worldwide.

It includes articles and twelve collections, exhibiting over 250 pieces of jewellery. 

  • Day trip to the gold shops in Al Nahir Street; As a teenager in the 1960’s in Baghdad, I frequently accompanied my mother to the Old Baghdad Centre visiting the many attractions on Rashid Street and Al Nahir Street, this article is a golden memory of these trips. The map traces our route.

  • Al Nahir Street (meaning River Street) is the first modern street that was opened in the traditional urban fabric of Baghdad city; it was the Ottoman governor Nadhum Pasha who ordered the opening of the street in the year 1910. The starting point to the street was Al Mustansiriya School.

  • Snapshot of one foreign woman’s impressions of a country at war, while she was armed only with: the shallow remains of Arabic language, her personal U.S. educational experience to extrapolate as a road map for others, one recent National Geographic article on Iraq, and an open heart.

  • Between 1996 to 1999, while Amir Harrak was working on Syriac Epigraphy at the Iraq Museum in Baghdad, he saw some of the Assyrian Jewellery from Nimrud exhibited, he was able to examine and photograph them. They are jewelleries of immense beauty.

  • Documentary of school days in Baghdad from the neighborhood kindergarten to end of high school. Memories of: 1. British Council Kindergarten / Ms. Saywell and Al Sadoon Park Neighbourhood, 2. Al Mansour Primary Private School, 3. Baghdad High School and 4. Al Sharqiya High School for Girls.

  • "The Beginnings, Al Mansour City" is a personal recollection of the city, its beginnings, its development, its people and community, the horse-racing track, Al Mansour Club, its streets, parks, schools and houses, while living in the city for 20 years from the mid-fifties to the mid-seventies.

  • These jewellery pieces were typically discovered in tombs and around temples as offerings for the gods. Most objects were found in the Phoenicians colonies such as Carthage in Tunis, Kition in Cyprus, in Italy, Morocco, Spain and Portugal with some finds in Byblos, Sidon and Tyre.

Items exhibited represents designs influenced by trends, culture, history and surrounding regions.  

FEEFAA is voluntary work of professionals, academics and art lovers, passionately gathered the material and created this documentary.

Best of knowledge, search for information and memory assembled together.

Providing bases for additions, comparison and further studies.  

Participate by submitting articles, collections and goldsmith biographies to FEEFAA. 

FEEFAA will expand its collections to include contemporary jewellery by selected artists in a new section named “exhibitions”.

Posts section includes related articles and memoirs. 

Exhibited jewellery items are grouped by collections, types and subtypes.

Celebrating the addition of the tenth collection “dune”.

Terminologies: Hujil is children anklet; Milwie is women’s anklet, today used as a bracelet; Baswand or Zanadi is arm band; Gardana or Gardunligh is a wide necklace choker; Gou Zair is gold beads 

Terminologies: Mantashi is a large chest brooch; Qobcha is a round brooch made of pearls; Sabah is a bracelet made of several chainsQardon is a chain necklace of a specific design.

Al Nahir Street Goldsmiths, Yousif Askar, Salim Sha’o, Khalil Malallah, and Hashim Al Warid were among the most well known names.